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Sci Rep. 2018 Sep 21;8(1):14217. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-32202-x.

Exceptional dinosaur fossils reveal early origin of avian-style digestion.

Author information

1
Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Linyi University, Linyi City, Shandong, 276005, China.
2
Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, Pingyi, Shandong, 273300, China.
3
Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Linyi University, Linyi City, Shandong, 276005, China. wang_7355@163.com.
4
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada.
5
Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, Wembley, Alberta, T0H 3S0, Canada.
6
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, People's Republic of China.
7
Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100044, China.
8
Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100044, China. xingxu@vip.sina.com.

Abstract

Birds have a highly specialized and efficient digestive system, but when this system originated remains uncertain. Here we report six gastric pellets attributable to the recently discovered 160-million-year-old troodontid dinosaur Anchiornis, which is among the key taxa for understanding the transition to birds. The gastric pellets contain lightly acid-etched lizard bones or fish scales, and some are associated with Anchiornis skeletons or even situated within the oesophagus. Anchiornis is the earliest and most basal theropod known to have produced gastric pellets. In combination with other lines of evidence, the pellets suggest that a digestive system resembling that of modern birds was already present in basal members of the Paraves, a clade including troodontids, dromaeosaurids, and birds, and that the evolution of modern avian digestion may have been related to the appearance of aerial locomotion in this lineage.

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