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Neurosci Lett. 2018 Nov 20;687:119-123. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2018.09.030. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Sex differences in the effects of adult short-term isolation rearing on contextual fear memory and extinction.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Showa Pharmaceutical University, 3-3165 Higashi-tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan; Department of Cognitive Behavioral Physiology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba, Chiba 260-8670, Japan; Department of Ultrastructural Research, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502, Japan. Electronic address: smatsuda@ac.shoyaku.ac.jp.
2
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Showa Pharmaceutical University, 3-3165 Higashi-tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan.

Abstract

Fear conditioning and extinction is a useful tool for understanding the pathogenesis of fear-related disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and for developing treatments for them. To investigate the role of sub-brain regions or molecular mechanisms in fear conditioning and extinction, neuroscientists have been employing an optogenetic or in vivo recording technique, in which placement of an optical fiber or an electrode into the brain region of a free-moving mouse is essential. These methods require isolation rearing (at least one week) from the brain surgery to the behavioral test. Although such short-term adult rearing has been shown not to influence fear memory and extinction in males, the effect in females remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect on fear memory and fear extinction of adult isolation rearing during the one week before contextual fear conditioning in both male and female mice. This short-term adult isolation rearing increased fear responses in the contextual fear memory test in females but not in males. On the other hand, the rearing showed no effect on fear responses during fear extinction or the recall test in either sex. In summary, adult short-term isolation rearing enhanced only fear memory, and only in females.

KEYWORDS:

Fear extinction; Fear memory; Isolation stress; Sex differences

PMID:
30240823
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2018.09.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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