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Hum Brain Mapp. 2019 Jan;40(1):262-283. doi: 10.1002/hbm.24370. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Mapping adolescent reward anticipation, receipt, and prediction error during the monetary incentive delay task.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
2
School of Psychology and Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
3
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont.
4
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
5
Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
6
Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
7
University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
8
Centre for Population Neuroscience and Stratified Medicine (PONS) and MRC-SGDP Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
10
Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
11
NeuroSpin, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, Paris, France.
12
Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
13
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
14
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig and Berlin, Braunschweig, Germany.
15
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 "Neuroimaging & Psychiatry", University Paris Sud - Paris Saclay, University Paris Descartes, Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, Orsay, and Maison de Solenn, Paris, France.
16
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest and Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
17
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Centre Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
18
Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
19
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
20
Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

The functional neuroanatomy and connectivity of reward processing in adults are well documented, with relatively less research on adolescents, a notable gap given this developmental period's association with altered reward sensitivity. Here, a large sample (n = 1,510) of adolescents performed the monetary incentive delay (MID) task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Probabilistic maps identified brain regions that were reliably responsive to reward anticipation and receipt, and to prediction errors derived from a computational model. Psychophysiological interactions analyses were used to examine functional connections throughout reward processing. Bilateral ventral striatum, pallidum, insula, thalamus, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, midbrain, motor area, and occipital areas were reliably activated during reward anticipation. Bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex and bilateral thalamus exhibited positive and negative activation, respectively, during reward receipt. Bilateral ventral striatum was reliably active following prediction errors. Previously, individual differences in the personality trait of sensation seeking were shown to be related to individual differences in sensitivity to reward outcome. Here, we found that sensation seeking scores were negatively correlated with right inferior frontal gyrus activity following reward prediction errors estimated using a computational model. Psychophysiological interactions demonstrated widespread cortical and subcortical connectivity during reward processing, including connectivity between reward-related regions with motor areas and the salience network. Males had more activation in left putamen, right precuneus, and middle temporal gyrus during reward anticipation. In summary, we found that, in adolescents, different reward processing stages during the MID task were robustly associated with distinctive patterns of activation and of connectivity.

KEYWORDS:

adolescence; functional connectivity; gender differences; reward processing; sensation seeking

PMID:
30240509
DOI:
10.1002/hbm.24370

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