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J Bone Miner Metab. 2018 Sep 20. doi: 10.1007/s00774-018-0959-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Change of skeletal muscle mass in patients with pheochromocytoma.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea.
2
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, South Korea.
3
Department of Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, South Korea.
5
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Dong-A University Medical Center, Dong-A, University College of Medicine, Busan, South Korea.
6
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
7
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 06351, South Korea. jaehyeon@skku.edu.
8
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea. umkbj0825@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

The effects of catecholamine excess due to pheochromocytoma on body composition, including skeletal muscle mass, are unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of catecholamine metabolites on body composition in subjects with pheochromocytoma. After body compositions using bioelectrical impedance analysis, urinary metanephrine (UM), and urinary normetanephrine (UNM) were measured in 16 patients with pheochromocytoma and 224 patients with nonfunctioning adrenal incidentaloma (NFAI), we compared skeletal muscle mass and fat mass (FM) between the two groups. After adjustments for confounders, UM (β = - 0.171, P = 0.006) and UNM (β = - 0.249, P < 0.001) levels were correlated inversely with skeletal muscle mass index (SMI), but not FM or percentage FM (pFM), in all subjects. Patients with pheochromocytoma had lower ASM by 7.7% (P = 0.022) and SMI by 6.6% (P = 0.001) than patients with NFAI. Conversely, FM and pFM were not statistically different between the two groups. The odds ratio for low skeletal muscle mass in the presence of pheochromocytoma was 10.33 (95% confidence interval, 2.65-40.22). Our results indicate that patients with pheochromocytoma have a reduced skeletal muscle mass and suggest that catecholamine excess has adverse effects on skeletal muscle metabolism.

KEYWORDS:

Catecholamine; Pheochromocytoma; Sarcopenia; Skeletal muscle

PMID:
30238430
DOI:
10.1007/s00774-018-0959-3

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