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Curr Pharm Teach Learn. 2018 Jul;10(7):955-963. doi: 10.1016/j.cptl.2018.04.016. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Comparison of pharmacy students' self-efficacy to address cessation counseling needs for traditional and electronic cigarette use.

Author information

1
Health Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice Division, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2409 University Avenue STOP A1930, Austin, TX 78712, United States. Electronic address: onduaguba@utexas.edu.
2
Health Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice Division, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2409 University Avenue STOP A1930, Austin, TX 78712, United States. Electronic address: kentya.ford@austin.utexas.edu.
3
Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems, School of Pharmacy, Bouve College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02111, United States. Electronic address: benitabam@utexas.edu.
4
John Peter Smith (JPS) Hospital, 1500 S Main Street, Fort Worth, TX 76104, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

This study assessed pharmacy students' self-rated ability to provide cessation counseling for e-cigarette use and traditional cigarette smoking.

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING:

A cross-sectional study was conducted in spring 2014 at The University of Texas at Austin. Participants included first through fourth year (P1-P4) doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. Perceived confidence and knowledge to counsel on cigarette smoking cessation and e-cigarette cessation were self-rated and based on the Ask-Advise-Assess-Assist-and Arrange (5 A's) follow-up model as well as general counseling skills for recreational nicotine product use cessation. Comparisons were made between students' confidence to counsel patients on traditional cigarette smoking cessation and e-cigarette cessation and by class level.

FINDINGS:

Compared to cigarette smoking cessation counseling, students were less confident in their ability to counsel on e-cigarette cessation using the 5 A's model and general counseling skills. Students perceived themselves to be less knowledgeable about the harmful effects of e-cigarettes, pharmacists' role in counseling on e-cigarette cessation, and how patients can benefit from e-cigarette cessation counseling. A higher proportion of students reported having no training on e-cigarette cessation compared to cigarette smoking cessation (59% vs 9%).

SUMMARY:

Targeted training on how to counsel patients on e-cigarette cessation should be included in pharmacy curricula. Such training is expected to increase the confidence of pharmacists-in-training to address the needs of patients who use e-cigarettes.

KEYWORDS:

Counseling; Education; Electronic cigarettes; Pharmacists; Students; Tobacco products

PMID:
30236434
DOI:
10.1016/j.cptl.2018.04.016

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