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BMC Microbiol. 2018 Sep 20;18(1):119. doi: 10.1186/s12866-018-1260-2.

Isolation and characterization of native probiotics for fish farming.

Author information

1
Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany. wanka@igb-berlin.de.
2
Gesellschaft für Marine Aquakultur mbH (GMA), Hafentörn 3, 25761, Büsum, Germany. wanka@igb-berlin.de.
3
Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Humboldt University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099, Berlin, Germany. wanka@igb-berlin.de.
4
Department of Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany.
5
Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR), Novo Edifício do Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Avenida Norton de Matos S/N, 4450-208, Matosinhos, Portugal.
6
Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS-UP), Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313, Porto, Portugal.
7
Gesellschaft für Marine Aquakultur mbH (GMA), Hafentörn 3, 25761, Büsum, Germany.
8
Institute for Animal Breeding and Husbandry, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Hermann-Rodewald-Straße 6, Kiel, Germany.
9
Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Humboldt University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Innovations in fish nutrition act as drivers for the sustainable development of the rapidly expanding aquaculture sector. Probiotic dietary supplements are able to improve health and nutrition of livestock, but respective bacteria have mainly been isolated from terrestrial, warm-blooded hosts, limiting an efficient application in fish. Native probiotics adapted to the gastrointestinal tract of the respective fish species will establish within the original host more efficiently.

RESULTS:

Here, 248 autochthonous isolates were cultured from the digestive system of three temperate flatfish species. Upon 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 195 isolates, 89.7% (n = 175) Gram-negatives belonging to the Alpha- (1.0%), Beta- (4.1%) and Gammaproteobacteria (84.6%) were identified. Candidate probiotics were further characterized using in vitro assays addressing 1) inhibition of pathogens, 2) degradation of plant derived anti-nutrient (saponin) and 3) the content of essential fatty acids (FA) and their precursors. Twelve isolates revealed an inhibition towards the common fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum, seven were able to metabolize saponin as sole carbon and energy source and two isolates 012 Psychrobacter sp. and 047 Paracoccus sp. revealed remarkably high contents of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Furthermore, a rapid and cost-effective method to coat feed pellets revealed high viability of the supplemented probiotics over 54 d of storage at 4°C.

CONCLUSIONS:

Here, a strategy for the isolation and characterization of native probiotic candidates is presented that can easily be adapted to other farmed fish species. The simple coating procedure assures viability of probiotics and can thus be applied for the evaluation of probiotic candidates in the future.

KEYWORDS:

Acinetobacter; Aquaculture; Diet preparation; Oral administration; PUFA; Probiotic supplementation; Psychrobacter; Saponin metabolization; Tenacibaculum maritimum

PMID:
30236057
PMCID:
PMC6148792
DOI:
10.1186/s12866-018-1260-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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