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J Clin Med. 2018 Sep 19;7(9). pii: E292. doi: 10.3390/jcm7090292.

Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Post-Surgery Incontinence in Men with Prostate Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Korea. urojpark@naver.com.
2
Department of Physical Education, Institute of Sport Science, Seoul National University College of Education, Seoul 08826, Korea. ycool14@snu.ac.kr.
3
Department of Urology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Korea. ebend@naver.com.
4
Department of Urology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Korea. kmoretry@daum.net.
5
Department of Urology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Korea. cmc1206@empal.com.
6
Department of Physical Education, Institute of Sport Science, Seoul National University College of Education, Seoul 08826, Korea. 0104day@naver.com.
7
Department of Physical Education, Institute of Sport Science, Seoul National University College of Education, Seoul 08826, Korea. songw3@snu.ac.kr.
8
Institute on Aging, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea. songw3@snu.ac.kr.
9
Department of Urology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Korea. drjeongh@gmail.com.

Abstract

We evaluated the efficacy of progressive resistance training of the pelvic floor muscle for post-prostatectomy incontinence. In this prospective study, 59 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were evaluated preoperatively. Continence was sequentially assessed within 2 weeks postoperatively, and an exercise regimen was initiated at 6- and 12-weeks. The primary outcome was continent status and the secondary outcome was changes in muscle strength and endurance after the exercise intervention. Continence was defined as no urine loss in a 1h pad test. A total of 59 patients participated in this study. Six patients dropped out of the study because of non-compliance and orthopedic problems. Of the remaining 53 patients, 31 (58.5%) achieved pad-free continence at 12 weeks postoperatively. The patients were divided into two groups based on their continence status, and no statistically significant difference was observed in age, body mass index, prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen, pathological Gleason score sum, and pathological T stage. Meanwhile, preoperative maximal urethral closure pressure and change in hip extensor muscle strength and endurance during the 12-week exercise program were significantly higher in the continent group. In multivariate analysis, change in hip extensor muscle strength was the only significant parameter predicting achievement of continence status (Odds ratio, 1.039; p = 0.045). The changes in hip extensor muscle strength in the current exercise program was an independent predictor of continence status after radical prostatectomy. A large-scale prospective study on the relationship between extensor muscle strength and urinary incontinence should be explored in future.

KEYWORDS:

incontinence; pelvic floor muscle; prostatectomy; resistance training

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