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Materials (Basel). 2018 Sep 17;11(9). pii: E1747. doi: 10.3390/ma11091747.

Developing a New Generation of Therapeutic Dental Polymers to Inhibit Oral Biofilms and Protect Teeth.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China. tuzizhangke@163.com.
2
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. tuzizhangke@163.com.
3
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. bbaras@umaryland.edu.
4
Restorative Dentistry, University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton T12 E8YV, Ireland. chris.lynch@ucc.ie.
5
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. mweir@umaryland.edu.
6
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. mmelo@umaryland.edu.
7
Clinical Research Center of Shaanxi Province for Dental and Maxillofacial Diseases, Key Laboratory of Shaanxi Province for Craniofacial Precision Medicine Research, College of Stomatology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710004, China. yuncong1982@mail.xjtu.edu.cn.
8
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. mreynolds@umaryland.edu.
9
Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China. byuxing@263.net.
10
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. dentistwanglin@126.com.
11
Department of Oral Implantology, School of Dentistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China. dentistwanglin@126.com.
12
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. wangsupingdent@163.com.
13
Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics & Stomatology Center, The First Affiliated Medical School of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China. wangsupingdent@163.com.
14
Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. hxu2@umaryland.edu.
15
Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. hxu2@umaryland.edu.
16
University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. hxu2@umaryland.edu.

Abstract

Polymeric tooth-colored restorations are increasingly popular in dentistry. However, restoration failures remain a major challenge, and more than 50% of all operative work was devoted to removing and replacing the failed restorations. This is a heavy burden, with the expense for restoring dental cavities in the U.S. exceeding $46 billion annually. In addition, the need is increasing dramatically as the population ages with increasing tooth retention in seniors. Traditional materials for cavity restorations are usually bioinert and replace the decayed tooth volumes. This article reviews cutting-edge research on the synthesis and evaluation of a new generation of bioactive dental polymers that not only restore the decayed tooth structures, but also have therapeutic functions. These materials include polymeric composites and bonding agents for tooth cavity restorations that inhibit saliva-based microcosm biofilms, bioactive resins for tooth root caries treatments, polymers that can suppress periodontal pathogens, and root canal sealers that can kill endodontic biofilms. These novel compositions substantially inhibit biofilm growth, greatly reduce acid production and polysaccharide synthesis of biofilms, and reduce biofilm colony-forming units by three to four orders of magnitude. This new class of bioactive and therapeutic polymeric materials is promising to inhibit tooth decay, suppress recurrent caries, control oral biofilms and acid production, protect the periodontium, and heal endodontic infections.

KEYWORDS:

antibacterial; bonding agents; caries inhibition; oral biofilms; periodontal pathogens; polymeric composites

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