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Support Care Cancer. 2019 Apr;27(4):1435-1441. doi: 10.1007/s00520-018-4459-8. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Dimensions of sedentary behavior and objective cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Division of Population Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dana-1167, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. CatherineR_Marinac@dfci.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. CatherineR_Marinac@dfci.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
4
Moores UC San Diego Cancer Center, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
5
Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine associations between dimensions of sedentary behavior and cognitive function in breast cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Sedentary behavior variables were measured using thigh-worn activPALs, and included total daily sitting time, time in long sitting bouts, sit-to-stand transitions, and standing time. Cognitive function was assessed using the NIH Toolbox Cognitive Domain. Separate multivariable linear regression models were used to examine associations between sedentary behavior variables with the cognitive domain scores of attention, executive functioning, episodic memory, working memory, and information processing speed.

RESULTS:

Thirty breast cancer survivors with a mean age of 62.2 (SD = 7.8) years who were 2.6 (SD = 1.1) years since diagnosis completed study assessments. In multivariable linear regression models, more time spent standing was associated with faster information processing (b: 5.78; p = 0.03), and more time spent in long sitting bouts was associated with worse executive function (b: -2.82; p = 0.02), after adjustment for covariates. No other sedentary behavior variables were statistically significantly associated with the cognitive domains examined in this study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Two important sedentary constructs that are amenable to intervention, including time in prolonged sitting bouts and standing time, may be associated with cognitive function in breast cancer survivors. More research is needed to determine whether modifying these dimensions of sedentary behavior will improve cognitive function in women with a history of breast cancer, or prevent it from declining in breast cancer patients.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Cognitive impairment; Sedentary; Sitting; Standing

PMID:
30225570
PMCID:
PMC6391205
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-018-4459-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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