Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Crit Care Clin. 2018 Oct;34(4):527-547. doi: 10.1016/j.ccc.2018.06.007. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Frailty and the Association Between Long-Term Recovery After Intensive Care Unit Admission.

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 2-124 Clinical Sciences Building, 11350 83 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3, Canada.
2
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 1-198 Clinical Sciences Building, 11350 83 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3, Canada.
3
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 2-124 Clinical Sciences Building, 11350 83 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3, Canada. Electronic address: bagshaw@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

Frailty is common, although infrequently screened for among patients admitted to intensive care. Frailty has been the focus of research in geriatric medicine; however, its epidemiology and interaction with critical illness have only recently been studied. Instruments to screen for and measure frailty require refinement in intensive care settings. Frail critically ill patients are at higher risk of poor outcomes. Frail survivors of critical illness are high users of health resources. Further research is needed to understand how frailty assessment can inform decision-making before and during an episode of critical illness and during an intensive care course for frail patients.

KEYWORDS:

Aged; Critical illness; Frail; Health-related quality of life; Mortality; Outcome; Prognosis; Recovery of function

PMID:
30223992
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccc.2018.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center