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Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2018 Nov;56(9):805-809. doi: 10.1016/j.bjoms.2018.08.015. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Review of outcomes of 500 consecutive cases of non-melanoma skin cancer of the head and neck managed in an oral and maxillofacial surgical unit in a District General Hospital.

Author information

1
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery department at Mugrove Park Hospital, Taunton and Somerset NHSFT, Parkfield drive, Taunton, TA15DA. Electronic address: ayesha.dalal@nhs.net.
2
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery department at Mugrove Park Hospital, Taunton and Somerset NHSFT, Parkfield drive, Taunton, TA15DA. Electronic address: James.Ingham@tst.nhs.uk.
3
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery department at Mugrove Park Hospital, Taunton and Somerset NHSFT, Parkfield drive, Taunton, TA15DA. Electronic address: benjamincollard@nhs.net.
4
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery department at Mugrove Park Hospital, Taunton and Somerset NHSFT, Parkfield drive, Taunton, TA15DA. Electronic address: Graham.Merrick@tst.nhs.uk.

Abstract

We provide a non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) service for skin cancers of the head and neck in the south-west of England. We hypothesised that certain anatomical sites such as the nose and eyelid would have a higher incidence of close or involved margins than others, and that the choice of repair might influence the excised margins. We therefore retrospectively analysed the data of 500 consecutive NMSC that were operated on in the oral and maxillofacial surgery unit of Taunton and Somerset NHS Trust. The database reports were crosschecked against the Trust's own pathology reporting system to ensure that they were accurate. Data collected included clinical and personal details of patients, anatomical sites, type of reconstruction, histopathological diagnosis, excision margins, and complications. Of the 500 patients reviewed 362 (72%) were basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and 138 (28%) squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The outcomes of 243 patients treated by primary closure, 134 treated by reconstruction with local flaps, and 123 treated by skin grafts, were reviewed with particular attention paid to the anatomical site and excision margins. There was an overall incomplete excision rate of 10.8% (n=54) and 29 patients developed complications (5.8%). We confirmed that rates of close or incomplete margins are more likely in certain anatomical sites such as the nose, forehead, and ear. The rate of involved margins was unaffected by choice of surgical technique.

KEYWORDS:

Basal cell carcinoma; Head and neck; Non-melanoma skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma; Surgical excision

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