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J Nutr Biochem. 2018 Dec;62:28-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.08.003. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Myeloperoxidase deficiency attenuates systemic and dietary iron-induced adverse effects.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
2
Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Toledo, OH 43614, USA.
3
Graduate Program in Immunology & Infectious Diseases, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
4
Department of Pathology, University of Toledo, OH 43614, USA.
5
Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Toledo, OH 43614, USA; Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology, University of Toledo, OH 43614, USA. Electronic address: MatamVijay.Kumar@utoledo.edu.

Abstract

Iron deficiency is routinely treated with oral or systemic iron supplements, which are highly reactive and could induce oxidative stress via augmenting the activity of proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). To investigate the extent to which MPO is involved in iron-induced toxicity, acute (24 h) iron toxicity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of FeSO4 (25 mg/kg body weight) to MPO-deficient (MpoKO) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Acute iron toxicity was also assessed in WT mice pretreated with an MPO inhibitor, 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Systemic iron administration up-regulated circulating MPO and neutrophil elastase and elevated systemic inflammatory and organ damage markers in WT mice. However, genetic deletion of MPO or its inhibition significantly reduced iron-induced organ damage and systemic inflammatory responses. In contrast to the acute model, 8 weeks of 2% carbonyl iron diet feeding to WT mice did not change the levels of circulating MPO and neutrophil elastase but promoted their accumulation in the liver. Even though both MpoKO and WT mice displayed similar levels of diet-induced hyperferremia, MpoKO mice showed significantly reduced inflammatory response and oxidative stress than the WT mice. In addition, WT bone-marrow-derived neutrophils (BMDN) generated more reactive oxygen species than MPO-deficient BMDN upon iron stimulation. Altogether, genetic deficiency or pharmacologic inhibition of MPO substantially attenuated acute and chronic iron-induced toxicity. Our results suggest that targeting MPO during iron supplementation is a promising approach to reduce iron-induced toxicity/side effects in vulnerable population.

KEYWORDS:

Acute phase proteins; Iron overload; MPO; Neutrophils; Proinflammatory cytokines; Reactive oxygen species

PMID:
30218980
PMCID:
PMC6263781
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.08.003

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