Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Neurophysiol. 2018 Nov;129(11):2276-2283. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.08.001. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Failure to generate baseline muscle motor evoked potentials during spine surgery: Risk factors and association with the postoperative outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sueh916@gmail.com.
5
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kpark78@naver.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify factors associated with the failure to generate baseline muscle motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) during spinal surgery, and to determine the association between baseline mMEP generation and postoperative outcomes.

METHODS:

A total of 345 patients who underwent spine surgery with intraoperative mMEP monitoring were included, and we retrospectively reviewed their demographic/clinical parameters, and mMEP recording results according to lesion locations.

RESULTS:

Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that preoperative Medical Research Council grade of the weakest muscle <3 was significantly associated with failure of baseline mMEP generation in both cervical and thoracic lesions. In addition, high intramedullary T2 signal intensity on spine MRI for cervical lesions and male sex for thoracic lesions were also significantly associated with baseline mMEP generation failure. Moreover, the failure of baseline mMEP generation was a significantly associated factor for poor functional outcome in patients with thoracic lesions.

CONCLUSION:

Sex, radiological abnormality, and preoperative functional status were associated with baseline mMEP generation failure during spine surgery with different patterns according to lesion location. Moreover, baseline mMEP generation failure in thoracic lesion could be associated with risk of postoperative deficits.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The risk of baseline mMEP recording failure could be evaluated based on preoperative clinical parameters.

KEYWORDS:

Baseline motor evoked potentials generation; Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring; Motor evoked potential; Spine surgery

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center