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Environ Pollut. 2018 Dec;243(Pt A):510-518. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2018.09.011. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Effects of Cd, Cu, Zn and their combined action on microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

Author information

1
Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, PR China.
2
Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, PR China. Electronic address: xmliu@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

Heavy metal pollution can decrease the soil microbial biomass and significantly alter microbial community structure. In this study, a long-term field experiment (5 years) and short-term laboratory experiment (40 d) were employed to evaluate the effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn), and their combinations at different concentrations, on the soil microbial biomass and the bacterial community. The ranges of heavy metal concentration in the long-term and short-term experiments were similar, with concentration ranges of Cd, Cu and Zn of about 0.3-1.5, 100-500, and 150-300 mg kg-1, respectively. Microbial biomass decreased with increasing soil heavy metal concentrations in both the long-term and short-term experiments. The interaction between soil physicochemical factors (pH, TN, TC) and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) played a major role in change in the bacterial community in long-term polluted soil. In the laboratory experiment, although each heavy metal had an adverse effect on the microbial biomass and community structure, Cu appeared to have a greater role in the changes compared to Cd and Zn. However, the synergistic effects of the heavy metals were greater than those of the single metals and the synergistic effect between Cu and Cd was greater than that of Cu and Zn.

KEYWORDS:

ATP; Bacterial community; Biomass C; Heavy metals

PMID:
30216883
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2018.09.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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