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Skeletal Radiol. 2019 Mar;48(3):413-419. doi: 10.1007/s00256-018-3046-x. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Preliminary investigation of brown adipose tissue assessed by PET/CT and cancer activity.

Author information

1
Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Yawkey 6E, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
2
Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1468 Madison Ave, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
4
Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Yawkey 6E, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. mbredella@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in cancer activity.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study group comprised 142 patients (121 female, 21 male; mean age, 49 ± 16 years) who underwent F18-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) for staging or surveillance of cancer and who were BAT-positive on PET/CT. BAT volume by PET/CT, abdominal (visceral and subcutaneous) fat and paraspinous muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) were assessed. Groups with and without active cancer on PET/CT were compared using a two-sided paired t test. Linear regression analyses between BAT and body composition parameters were performed.

RESULTS:

There were 62 patients (54 female, eight male) who had active cancer on PET/CT and 80 patients (67 female, 13 male) without active cancer. Groups were similar in age and BMI (p ≥ 0.4), abdominal fat and muscle CSA, fasting glucose, and outside temperature at time of scan (p ≥ 0.2). Patients who had active cancer on PET/CT had higher BAT volume compared to patients without active cancer (p = 0.009). In patients without active cancer, BAT was positively associated with BMI and abdominal fat depots (r = 0.46 to r = 0.59, p < 0.0001) while there were no such associations in patients with active cancer (p ≥ 0.1). No associations between BAT and age or muscle CSA were found (p ≥ 0.1).

CONCLUSIONS:

BAT activity is greater in patients with active cancer compared to age-, sex-, and BMI-matched BAT-positive patients without active cancer, suggesting a possible role of BAT in cancer activity.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Brown adipose tissue (BAT); Cancer activity; FDG-PET/CT

PMID:
30215105
PMCID:
PMC6345160
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s00256-018-3046-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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