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Eur J Pediatr. 2018 Dec;177(12):1863-1867. doi: 10.1007/s00431-018-3241-8. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Pediatric residents' simulation-based training in patient safety during sedation.

Friedman N1,2, Sagi D2, Ziv A2,3, Shavit I4,5,6,7.

Author information

1
Pediatric Emergency Department, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
2
Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR), Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
3
Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
4
Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR), Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. itai@pem-database.org.
5
Pediatric Emergency Department, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel. itai@pem-database.org.
6
The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport, Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. itai@pem-database.org.
7
, Kibutz Maayan Tzvi, Israel. itai@pem-database.org.

Abstract

In Israeli emergency departments, pediatric residents are allowed to independently perform procedural sedation after training. Preparing the residents to practice unsupervised sedations requires participation in a simulation-based training in patient safety during sedation (STPSDS). The study objective was to evaluate participants' perception of knowledge and confidence from the STPSDS. We performed a retrospective analysis of participants' self-reported perception of knowledge acquisition. At the end of each course, participants were requested to rate, anonymously and independently, the training contribution to their knowledge and confidence using a four-point Likert scale. Between January 2010 and December 2017, 321 pediatric residents participated in 67 STPSDS courses; 315 completed the self-assessments. Participants' median responses of the training contribution were 4 (IQR 3-4) for overall knowledge, 4 (IQR 4-4) for understanding potential complications during sedation, 3 (IQR 3-4) for knowledge in managing adverse events, and 3 (IQR 2-4) for knowledge in practicing safe sedation. Median response for contribution to participants' confidence in performing sedation was 3 (IQR 3-4).Conclusion: We found that the STPSDS improved perception of knowledge and confidence among pediatric residents. Our findings suggest that this training has a valuable role in preparing pediatric residents to practice unsupervised sedations in the ED. What is Known: • In Israel, sedation-trained pediatric residents performed sedations in the Emergency Department • Successful completion of a simulation-based training in patient safety during sedation (STPSDS) is a mandatory requirement to perform unsupervised sedation. What is New: • The STPSDS improved perception of knowledge and confidence among pediatric residents. • This training may be valuable in preparing pediatric residents to practice unsupervised sedations.

KEYWORDS:

Residents; Sedation; Simulation; Training

PMID:
30215096
DOI:
10.1007/s00431-018-3241-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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