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Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2018 Sep 13. pii: S1084-9521(18)30035-1. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2018.09.005. [Epub ahead of print]

The role of ubiquitination in the regulation of primary cilia assembly and disassembly.

Author information

1
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, H2W 1R7, Canada; Division of Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H4A 3J1, Canada.
2
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, H2W 1R7, Canada; Division of Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H4A 3J1, Canada; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address: william.tsang@ircm.qc.ca.

Abstract

The primary cilium is a cellular antenna found on the surface of many eukaryotic cells, whose main role is to sense and transduce signals that regulate growth, development, and differentiation. Although once believed to be a vestigial organelle without important function, it has become clear that defects in primary cilium are responsible for a wide variety of genetic diseases affecting many organs and tissues, including the brain, eyes, heart, kidneys, liver, and pancreas. The primary cilium is mainly present in quiescent and differentiated cells, and controls must exist to ensure that this organelle is assembled or disassembled at the right time. Although many protein components required for building the cilium have been identified, mechanistic details of how these proteins are spatially and temporally regulated and how these regulations are connected to external cues are beginning to emerge. This review article highlights the role of ubiquitination and in particular, E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases, in the control of primary cilia assembly and disassembly.

KEYWORDS:

Centrioles; Centrosomes; Deubiquitinases; Primary cilia; Ubiquitin ligases; Ubiquitination

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