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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Sep 14;67(36):1001-1006. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6736a2.

Prevalence of Chronic Pain and High-Impact Chronic Pain Among Adults - United States, 2016.

Abstract

Chronic pain, one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care (1), has been linked to restrictions in mobility and daily activities (2,3), dependence on opioids (4), anxiety and depression (2), and poor perceived health or reduced quality of life (2,3). Population-based estimates of chronic pain among U.S. adults range from 11% to 40% (5), with considerable population subgroup variation. As a result, the 2016 National Pain Strategy called for more precise prevalence estimates of chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain (i.e., chronic pain that frequently limits life or work activities) to reliably establish the prevalence of chronic pain and aid in the development and implementation of population-wide pain interventions (5). National estimates of high-impact chronic pain can help differentiate persons with limitations in major life domains, including work, social, recreational, and self-care activities from those who maintain normal life activities despite chronic pain, providing a better understanding of the population in need of pain services. To estimate the prevalence of chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain in the United States, CDC analyzed 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. An estimated 20.4% (50.0 million) of U.S. adults had chronic pain and 8.0% of U.S. adults (19.6 million) had high-impact chronic pain, with higher prevalences of both chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain reported among women, older adults, previously but not currently employed adults, adults living in poverty, adults with public health insurance, and rural residents. These findings could be used to target pain management interventions.

PMID:
30212442
PMCID:
PMC6146950
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6736a2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. Robert Kerns reports receiving honoraria for serving as a member of a research grant review board for the American Pain Society and as senior editor for the journal Pain Medicine. Michael Von Korff reports receipt of grants from Pfizer Inc. as an investigator of use and misuse of opioids at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and from inVentive as co-investigator for Food and Drug Administration–mandated postmarketing surveillance studies of extended release opioids. No other conflicts of interest were reported.

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