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Neuroimage Clin. 2018 Aug 31;20:664-673. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.08.032. eCollection 2018.

Towards patient-specific modeling of brain tumor growth and formation of secondary nodes guided by DTI-MRI.

Author information

1
Cancer Biophysics laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
2
Department of Diagnostic Physics, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
3
Department of Radiology, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
4
Cancer Biophysics laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: tstylian@ucy.ac.cy.

Abstract

Previous studies to simulate brain tumor progression, often investigate either temporal changes in cancer cell density or the overall tissue-level growth of the tumor mass. Here, we developed a computational model to bridge these two approaches. The model incorporates the tumor biomechanical response at the tissue level and accounts for cellular events by modeling cancer cell proliferation, infiltration to surrounding tissues, and invasion to distant locations. Moreover, acquisition of high resolution human data from anatomical magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion imaging was employed within the simulations towards a realistic and patient specific model. The model predicted the intratumoral mechanical stresses to range from 20 to 34 kPa, which caused an up to 4.5 mm displacement to the adjacent healthy tissue. Furthermore, the model predicted plausible cancer cell invasion patterns within the brain along the white matter fiber tracts. Finally, by varying the tumor vascular density and its invasive outer ring thickness, our model showed the potential of these parameters for guiding the timing (83-90 days) of cancer cell distant invasion as well as the number (0-2 sites) and location (temportal and/or parietal lobe) of the invasion sites.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanics; Brain; DTI-MRI; Glioblastoma; Tumor distant invasion; Tumor growth; Tumor perfusion

PMID:
30211003
PMCID:
PMC6134360
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2018.08.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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