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Neuroimage Clin. 2018 Sep 4;20:650-654. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.09.003. eCollection 2018.

The effect of physical exercise on cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
2
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; Center for Magnetic Resonance, DTU Elektro, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs Lyngby, Denmark.
3
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Danish Dementia Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit and Institute of Sports Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark; Center for Healthy Aging, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: elga@sund.ku.dk.

Abstract

In recent years there has been an increasing focus on the relation between cerebrovascular health, physical exercise and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of moderate-to-high-intensity aerobic exercise on cerebral blood flow in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Fifty-one patients were randomized to either usual care or moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise for 16 weeks. Exercise had no consistent effect on whole brain or regional cerebral blood flow. Sixteen weeks of exercise are, therefore, not sufficient to produce a consistent increase in cerebral blood flow in a relatively small sample of Alzheimer's patients.

KEYWORDS:

ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; AD, Alzheimer's disease; Alzheimer's Disease; Arterial Spin labeling; CBF, cerebral blood flow; Cerebral Blood Flow; MCI, mild cognitive impairment; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; MRI; PCC, posterior cingulate gyrus; Physical Exercise; Randomized Controlled Trial; SPG, superior parietal gyrus

PMID:
30211001
PMCID:
PMC6129739
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2018.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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