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Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2018 Aug 28;9:484. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2018.00484. eCollection 2018.

Nesfatin-1 Regulates Feeding, Glucosensing and Lipid Metabolism in Rainbow Trout.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Integrative Neuroendocrinology, Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
2
Laboratorio de Fisioloxía Animal, Departamento de Bioloxía Funcional e Ciencias da Saúde, Facultade de Bioloxía and Centro de Investigación Mariña, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
3
Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas-Instituto Tecnológico Chascomús, Chascomús, Argentina.

Abstract

Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid peptide that has been involved in a wide variety of physiological functions in both mammals and fish. This study aimed to elucidate the role of nesfatin-1 on rainbow trout food intake, and its putative effects on glucose and fatty acid sensing systems. Intracerebroventricular administration of 25 ng/g nesfatin-1 resulted in a significant inhibition of appetite, likely mediated by the activation of central POMC and CART. Nesfatin-1 stimulated the glucosensing machinery (changes in sglt1, g6pase, gsase, and gnat3 mRNA expression) in the hindbrain and hypothalamus. Central fatty acid sensing mechanisms were unaltered by nesfatin-1, but this peptide altered the expression of mRNAs encoding factors regulating lipid metabolism (fat/cd36, acly, mcd, fas, lpl, pparα, and pparγ), suggesting that nesfatin-1 promotes lipid accumulation in neurons. In the liver, intracerebroventricular nesfatin-1 treatment resulted in decreased capacity for glucose use and lipogenesis, and increased the potential of fatty acid oxidation. Altogether, the present results demonstrate that nesfatin-1 is involved in the homeostatic regulation of food intake and metabolism in fish.

KEYWORDS:

NUCB2; fish; hindbrain; hypothalamus; liver; nutrient sensing

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