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Lab Invest. 2018 Dec;98(12):1527-1537. doi: 10.1038/s41374-018-0126-4. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Vitamin D protects human melanocytes against oxidative damage by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

Tang L1,2, Fang W1,3, Lin J1,2, Li J1,2, Wu W4,5, Xu J6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
2
The Shanghai Institute of Dermatology, Shanghai, China.
3
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Medical Mycology, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
4
Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. wuwenyu@medmail.com.cn.
5
The Shanghai Institute of Dermatology, Shanghai, China. wuwenyu@medmail.com.cn.
6
Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. xjhhsyy@163.com.
7
The Shanghai Institute of Dermatology, Shanghai, China. xjhhsyy@163.com.

Abstract

Vitamin D analogs have been widely utilized for the treatment of vitiligo, but the molecular mechanism underlying their pharmacological effects (especially their antioxidant properties) has not yet been investigated. We evaluated the relationship between serum vitamin D level and oxidative damage severity in vitiligo patients, and investigated the molecular mechanism of vitamin D in protecting melanocytes against oxidative stress. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and malondialdehyde (MDA) were first measured in patients. A variety of in vitro experiments such as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), cellular viability, migration, and apoptotic assays were then performed to detect the effects of vitamin D or β-catenin silencing on H2O2-treated melanocytes. Expression of Wnt/β-catenin, Nrf2, apoptotic, and MITF pathways was finally examined using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. In this study, we initially found that vitamin D insufficiency was closely associated with the severity of oxidative stress in vitiligo patients. Using ex vivo cell models, we further showed that vitamin D positively modulated β-catenin signaling at both translational and posttranslational levels in melanocytes under oxidative stress. Like WNT agonists, vitamin D significantly inhibited ROS accumulation and cell apoptosis in H2O2-treated melanocytes and promoted their proliferative and migratory activity, while the protective effects of vitamin D against oxidative stress were abolished by β-catenin silencing in melanocytes. Furthermore, β-catenin deficiency also blocked the activation of Nrf2 and MITF as well as the inhibition of apoptosis induced by vitamin D. Taken together, vitamin D insufficiency was associated with severity of oxidative stress in vitiligo patients. Our work also provides new insights into the mechanism of vitamin D against vitiligo, in which vitamin D protects melanocytes against oxidative stress by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

PMID:
30206310
DOI:
10.1038/s41374-018-0126-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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