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J Pediatr Urol. 2019 Feb;15(1):48.e1-48.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2018.08.003. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Keloid formation after pediatric male genital surgeries: an uncommon and difficult problem to manage.

Author information

1
Division of Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Urology Division, Department of Surgery, King Saud University, King Saud University Medical City and College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: faalyami@ksu.edu.sa.
2
Division of Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Division of Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Sidra Medical and Research Center, Doha, Qatar.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Penile and genital keloids are uncommon despite frequent surgeries in the genital area. Keloid scar pathogenesis is not well understood, and a uniform effective therapeutic regimen for keloids has not yet been established. In the present study, the clinical features and subsequent management in cases of severe keloid formation after pediatric genital surgery are described.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of keloid cases that had developed after genital procedures between 2000 and 2017 was conducted. Pre-operative characteristics, operative procedures, postoperative management, and follow-up were reviewed for each case. All cases were managed by a multidisciplinary team that included plastic surgeons and dermatologists.

RESULT:

Six cases developed genital keloids. The mean age at surgery was 5.6 years (± standard deviation 4.6 years). Procedures included phalloplasties, penile curvature correction, penoscrotal transposition, redo hypospadias repair, and circumcision. Treatment options included excision of the keloid ± topical steroid injections and postoperative use of silicone gel. Two cases of severe keloid lesions developed after using posterior auricular grafts. Ultimately, a successful outcome was achieved in all cases.

CONCLUSION:

Genital keloids are rare and difficult to treat. Many therapeutic options are available with varying degrees of proven clinical success. As a result, pediatric urologists must be aware of advances in other fields such as plastic surgery and dermatology to treat and ideally prevent the occurrence of this serious complication.

KEYWORDS:

Circumcision; Hypertrophic scar; Keloid; Penile surgery

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