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Early Hum Dev. 2018 Nov;126:23-27. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2018.08.013. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

Intrauterine growth restriction and later cardiovascular function.

Author information

1
Fetal Medicine Research Center, BCNatal - Barcelona Center for Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine (Hospital Clínic and Hospital Sant Joan de Deu), ICGON, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Centre for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBER-ER), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: fcrispi@clinic.cat.
2
Fetal Medicine Research Center, BCNatal - Barcelona Center for Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine (Hospital Clínic and Hospital Sant Joan de Deu), ICGON, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Centre for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBER-ER), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: fcrovetto@clinic.cat.
3
Fetal Medicine Research Center, BCNatal - Barcelona Center for Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine (Hospital Clínic and Hospital Sant Joan de Deu), ICGON, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Centre for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBER-ER), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: gratacos@clinic.cat.

Abstract

Intrauterine growth restriction is one of the most common obstetric conditions, affecting 7-10% of fetuses. Affected fetuses are actually exposed in utero to an adverse environment during the highly critical time of development and may face life-long health consequences such as increased cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Already in utero, fetuses affected by growth restriction show remodeled hearts with signs of systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Cardiovascular remodeling persist into postnatal life, from the neonatal period to adolescence, suggesting a primary fetal cardiac programming that might explain the increased cardiovascular risk later in life. In this review we summarize the current evidence on fetal cardiovascular programming in fetuses affected by growth restriction, its consequences later and possible strategies from which they could benefit to reduce their cardiovascular risk.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular dysfunction; Fetal programming; Intrauterine growth restriction

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