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Exp Neurol. 2019 Jan;311:33-43. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2018.09.002. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

ERα and/or ERβ activation ameliorates cognitive impairment, neurogenesis and apoptosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China. Electronic address: tang_susu@126.com.
2
Department of Pharmacology, Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China. Electronic address: huqh@cpu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Estrogen receptors (ERs) are thought to be associated with the onset and progression of neurodegenerative injuries and diseases, but the relationship and mechanisms underlying between ERs and cognition in type 2 diabetes remain elusive. In the current study, we investigated the effects of ERα and ERβ on the cognition, neurogenesis and apoptosis in high-fat diet and streptozocin-induced diabetic mice. We found that ERα and/or ERβ activation using their agonists (0.5 mg/kg E2, PPT or DPN) ameliorate memory impairment in the Morris water maze and Y-maze tests, increase hippocampal neurogenesis and prevent hippocampal apoptotic responses. Importantly, treatment with the pharmacologic ERs agonists caused significant increases in the membrane ERα and ERβ expression and subsequent PI3K/Akt, CREB and BDNF activation in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetes mellitus mice. Our data indicate that ERα and ERβ are involved in the cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes, and that activated ERs, such as application of ERs agonists, could be a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic cognitive impairment.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Cognition; Estrogen receptor α; Estrogen receptor β; Neurogenesis; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
30201537
DOI:
10.1016/j.expneurol.2018.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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