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J Pediatr. 2018 Dec;203:125-130.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.07.046. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Timing of Information-Seeking about Infant Vaccines.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO. Electronic address: sean.oleary@ucdenver.edu.
2
Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess among pregnant and recently delivered women the timing of thinking about and seeking information about childhood vaccines and the preferred modes of vaccine education.

STUDY DESIGN:

An e-mail survey among women in 9 urban and rural obstetrics practices in Colorado was conducted from February to April 2014, timed so that approximately one-half had delivered and one-half were still pregnant, designed to assess the frequency of thinking about and seeking information about vaccines in relation to estimated or actual delivery date. A shortened version of the Parental Attitudes About Childhood Vaccines scale was used to assess vaccine hesitancy.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 54% (230 of 425); 56% were pregnant, 44% had delivered, and 18% were vaccine-hesitant. Compared with pregnant women, women who had delivered more often reported thinking about vaccines for their infant (pregnant: 19% often, 42% sometimes; delivered: 29% often, 51% sometimes; P < .05) and looking for information about vaccines (pregnant: 6% often, 22% sometimes; delivered: 16% often, 34% sometimes; P < .01). Women most frequently reported seeking information about vaccines 2-4 weeks after delivery, followed by 4-6 weeks after delivery. The most preferred method for vaccine education was their child's doctor (95% acceptable; 92% likely to use) followed by their obstetrician (79% acceptable; 64% likely to use).

CONCLUSIONS:

Within 6 weeks postdelivery appears to be when the most women seek vaccine information. A child's doctor remains the most acceptable source of vaccine education.

KEYWORDS:

immunization; public health

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