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Can J Anaesth. 2018 Dec;65(12):1333-1347. doi: 10.1007/s12630-018-1217-9. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Point-of-care viscoelastic hemostatic testing in cardiac surgery patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Section of Cardiac Surgery, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. carlylodewyks@gmail.com.
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. carlylodewyks@gmail.com.
3
, Y3505-409 Taché Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R2H 2A6, Canada. carlylodewyks@gmail.com.
4
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
5
Department of Anesthesia, Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, and Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
6
Neil John Maclean Library, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
7
Department of Surgery, Section of Cardiac Surgery, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
9
Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
10
George & Fay Yee Center for Healthcare Innovation, University of Manitoba/Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry are point-of-care (POC) viscoelastic tests used to help guide blood product administration. It is unclear whether these tests improve clinical or transfusion-related outcomes. The objective of this study was to appraise data from randomized trials evaluating the benefit of POC testing in cardiac surgery patients. Primary outcomes were the proportion of patients transfused with blood products and all-cause mortality.

SOURCE:

Medline (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library-Wiley), Web of Science, Biosis, Scopus, and CINAHL databases, as well as clinical trial registries and conference proceedings were queried from inception to February 2018.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We identified 1,917 records, 11 of which were included in our analysis (8,294 patients). Point-of-care testing was not associated with a difference in the proportion of patients transfused with any blood product (risk ratio [RR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.02; I2 = 51%; four trials, 7,623 patients), or all-cause mortality (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.13; I2 = 5%; six trials, 7,931 patients). Nevertheless, POC testing was weakly associated with a decrease in the proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (RBC) (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96; I2 = 0%; seven trials, 8,029 patients), and heterogeneous reductions in frozen plasma (FP) (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.99; I2 = 87%; six trials, 7,989 patients) and platelets (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.90; I2 = 65%; seven trials, 8,029 patients). Meta-analysis of the number of units of RBCs and FP was not possible due to heterogeneity in reporting, however POC testing significantly reduced the units of platelets transfused (standard mean difference, -0.09; 95% CI, -0.18 to 0.00; four trials, 7,643 patients).

CONCLUSION:

Our review indicates that in cardiac surgery patients, POC viscoelastic hemostatic testing is not associated with a reduction in the proportion of patients receiving any blood product or all-cause mortality. However, viscoelastic testing is weakly associated with a reduction in proportion of patients transfused with specific blood products. Presently, the benefits associated with viscoelastic testing in cardiac surgery patients are insufficiently robust to recommend routine implementation of this technology.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

PROSPERO (CRD4201706577). Registered 11 May 2017.

PMID:
30194674
DOI:
10.1007/s12630-018-1217-9

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