Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Nov 1;154(11):1265-1271. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.3022.

Comparison of Dermatologist Density Between Urban and Rural Counties in the United States.

Author information

1
The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York.
2
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

Importance:

As the US population continues to increase and age, there is an unmet need for dermatologic care; therefore, it is important to identify and understand the characteristics and patterns of the dermatologist workforce.

Objective:

To analyze the longitudinal dermatologist density and urban-rural disparities using a standardized classification scheme.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

This study analyzed county-level data for 1995 to 2013 from the Area Health Resources File to evaluate the longitudinal trends and demographic and environmental factors associated with the geographic distribution of dermatologists.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

Active US dermatologist and physician density.

Results:

In this study of nationwide data on dermatologists, dermatologist density increased by 21% from 3.02 per 100 000 people to 3.65 per 100 000 people from 1995 to 2013; the gap between the density of dermatologists in urban and other areas increased from 2.63 to 3.06 in nonmetropolitan areas and from 3.41 to 4.03 in rural areas. The ratio of dermatologists older than 55 years to younger than 55 years increased 75% in nonmetropolitan and rural areas (from 0.32 to 0.56) and 170% in metropolitan areas (from 0.34 to 0.93). Dermatologists tended to be located in well-resourced, urban communities.

Conclusions and Relevance:

Our findings suggest that substantial disparities in the geographic distribution of dermatologists exist and have been increasing with time. Correcting the workforce disparity is important for patient care.

PMID:
30193349
PMCID:
PMC6248119
DOI:
10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.3022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center