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J Urol. 2019 Feb;201(2):268-276. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2018.08.046.

Which Patients with Negative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Safely Avoid Biopsy for Prostate Cancer?

Author information

1
USC Institute of Urology and Catherine and Joseph Aresty Department of Urology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
2
Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Departments of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
4
Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We sought to determine whether there is a subset of men who can avoid prostate biopsy based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and clinical characteristics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Of 1,149 consecutive men who underwent prostate biopsy from October 2011 to March 2017, 135 had prebiopsy negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging with PI-RADS™ (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System) score less than 3. The detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer was evaluated according to prostate specific antigen density and prior biopsy history. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Grade Group 2 or greater. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of nonclinically significant prostate cancer on biopsy.

RESULTS:

The prostate cancer and clinically significant prostate cancer detection rates were 38% and 18%, respectively. Men with biopsy detected, clinically significant prostate cancer had a smaller prostate (p = 0.004), higher prostate specific antigen density (p = 0.02) and no history of prior negative biopsy (p = 0.01) compared to the nonclinically significant prostate cancer cohort. Prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml/cc (p <0.001) and prior negative biopsy (p = 0.005) were independent predictors of absent clinically significant prostate cancer on biopsy. The negative predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for biopsy detection of clinically significant prostate cancer improved with decreasing prostate specific antigen density, primarily in men with prior negative biopsy (p = 0.001) but not in biopsy naïve men. Of the men 32% had the combination of negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml/cc and negative prior biopsy, and none had clinically significant prostate cancer on repeat biopsy. The incidence of biopsy identified, clinically significant prostate cancer was 18%, 10% and 0% in men with negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging only, men with negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml/cc, and men with negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml/cc and negative prior biopsy, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

We propose that a subset of men with negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml/cc and prior negative biopsy may safely avoid rebiopsy. Conversely prostate biopsy should be considered in biopsy naïve men regardless of negative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, particularly those with prostate specific antigen density greater than 0.15 ng/ml/cc.

Comment in

PMID:
30189186
PMCID:
PMC6677264
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2018.08.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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