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Int J Cancer. 2018 Dec 1;143(11):2787-2799. doi: 10.1002/ijc.31848. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Consumption of red and processed meat and breast cancer incidence: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
4
Division of Prevention, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
5
HuGeF Foundation, Torino, Italy.
6
MRC-PHE Center for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
7
Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
8
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
10
Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI.
11
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

Prior studies on red and processed meat consumption with breast cancer risk have generated inconsistent results. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize the evidence regarding the relation of red meat and processed meat consumption with breast cancer incidence. We searched in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases through January 2018 for prospective studies that reported the association between red meat and processed meat consumption with incident breast cancer. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk (RR) was combined comparing the highest with the lowest category of red meat (unprocessed) and processed meat consumption using a random-effect meta-analysis. We identified 13 cohort, 3 nested case-control and two clinical trial studies. Comparing the highest to the lowest category, red meat (unprocessed) consumption was associated with a 6% higher breast cancer risk (pooled RR,1.06; 95% confidence intervals (95%CI):0.99-1.14; I2 = 56.3%), and processed meat consumption was associated with a 9% higher breast cancer risk (pooled RR, 1.09; 95%CI, 1.03-1.16; I2 = 44.4%). In addition, we identified two nested case-control studies evaluating the association between red meat and breast cancer stratified by N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator genotype. We did not observe any association among those with either fast (per 25 g/day pooled odds ratio (OR), 1.18; 95%CI, 0.93-1.50) or slow N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylators (per 25 g/day pooled OR, 0.99; 95%CI, 0.91-1.08). In the prospective observational studies, high processed meat consumption was associated with increased breast cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylators; breast cancer; meta-analysis; processed meat; red meat

PMID:
30183083
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.31848

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