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J Cancer Surviv. 2018 Dec;12(6):744-752. doi: 10.1007/s11764-018-0711-y. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

Barriers to physical activity: a study of academic and community cancer survivors with pain.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. romeros1@mskcc.org.
2
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Bendheim Integrative Medicine Center, 1429 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10021, USA. romeros1@mskcc.org.
3
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, Philadelphia, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
7
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. maoj@mskcc.org.
8
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Bendheim Integrative Medicine Center, 1429 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10021, USA. maoj@mskcc.org.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Despite the numerous benefits of physical activity (PA) for patients with cancer, many cancer survivors report challenges to participating in PA. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess barriers to PA and (2) to examine participant characteristics associated with modifiable barriers to PA among cancer survivors with pain.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional survey study at one academic medical center and 11 community hospitals. Participants completed the 12-item Physical Activity Barriers After Cancer (PABAC) instrument (Cronbach's alpha = 0.75). Multivariable regression models examined participant characteristics associated with PABAC scores with a higher score indicating more barriers to PA.

RESULTS:

Among 662 survivors, 67% had moderate or severe pain (rating 4 or greater on a scale of 0 to 10). Seventy-five percent of survivors did not meet the American Cancer Society PA recommendations on average, and these individuals had higher mean PABAC scores (beta coefficient (β) = 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-3.09, p < 0.001). In adjusted analyses, cancer survivors who were non-white (β = 1.55, 0.28-2.82, p = 0.02), treated at a community hospital (β = 1.07, 0.09-2.05, p = 0.03), had surgery (β = 1.69, 0.69-2.69, p = 0.001), or within 12 months of diagnosis (β = 1.15, 0.20-2.10, p = 0.02) reported greater barriers to PA.

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of cancer survivors with pain are not adequately participating in PA. Key demographic and clinical characteristics are associated with survivors' barriers.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

Efforts to overcome specific barriers are needed to promote PA after a cancer diagnosis.

KEYWORDS:

Barriers; Cancer survivors; Pain; Physical activity

PMID:
30182150
PMCID:
PMC6461363
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11764-018-0711-y

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