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Ann Rehabil Med. 2018 Aug;42(4):560-568. doi: 10.5535/arm.2018.42.4.560. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Association of Brain Lesions and Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale Parameters on Patients With Acute Cerebral Infarctions.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dong-Eui Medical Center, Busan, Korea.
2
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the characteristics and risk factors of dysphagia using the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in patients with acute cerebral infarctions.

METHODS:

In this retrospective study, the baseline VFSS in 275 stroke patients was analyzed. We divided patients into 8 groups according to lesion areas commonly observed on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the VDS. We also analyzed the relationship between clinical and functional parameters based on medical records and VDS scores.

RESULTS:

In comparison studies of lesions associated with swallowing dysfunction, several groups with significant differences were identified. Apraxia was more closely associated with cortical middle cerebral artery territory lesions. Vallecular and pyriform sinus residue was more common with lesions in the medulla or pons. In addition, the results for the Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), a functional assessment tool, corresponded to those in the quantitative evaluation of swallowing dysfunctions.

CONCLUSION:

A large cohort of patients with cerebral infarction was evaluated to determine the association between brain lesions and swallowing dysfunction. The results can be used to establish a specific treatment plan. In addition, the characteristic factors associated with swallowing dysfunctions were also confirmed.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral infarction; Deglutition; Deglutition disorders; Fluoroscopy

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