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Chemosphere. 2018 Dec;212:777-783. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.08.104. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Phototransformation of p-arsanilic acid in aqueous media containing nitrogen species.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China.
2
School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China.
3
Department of Environmental Science, School of Resource and Environmental Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China. Electronic address: xiajun666@whu.edu.cn.
5
State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China. Electronic address: zhangxiang@whu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The effects of co-existing nitrogen species in surface water on the phototransformation of organoarsenical p-arsanilic acid (p-ASA) have been investigated using a xenon lamp as a simulated solar light source. Significant enhancements of p-ASA phototransformation efficiency were observed in the presence of nitrate and nitrite, increasing with the concentration of these species and pH, whereas ammonia showed no obvious effect. The products, including inorganic arsenic species and organic derivatives, have been analyzed in order to reveal the phototransformation pathways. In the nitrate and nitrite systems, only small proportions of inorganic arsenic species were generated, with the majority of p-ASA being converted into other organoarsenical derivatives through hydroxylation, nitration, and nitrosation. Phototransformation of p-ASA in collected natural surface water was also observed. This work has implications for the phototransformation of p-ASA in nitrogen-contaminated surface water.

KEYWORDS:

Nitrogen species; Organoarsenic feed additives; Photochemical reaction; Simulated solar irradiation

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