Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 1;649:902-908. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.368. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Turning pig manure into biochar can effectively mitigate antibiotic resistance genes as organic fertilizer.

Author information

1
State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
2
State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. Electronic address: minqiao@rcees.ac.cn.
3
Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
5
Jiaxing Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jiaxing 314016, China.
6
State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China.

Abstract

The composting of fresh manure is an effective way to inactivate pathogens and reduce the levels of antibiotics and some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) prior to its application on agricultural land as organic fertilizer. However, some ARGs could still exist and even be enriched after composting. This study investigated whether converting composted pig manure into biochar could reduce the dissemination of ARGs into the soil in comparison with a compost amendment. We performed a pot experiment using pakchoi (Brassica chinensis), with two pig manure-based composts and the biochar derived from composted pig manure, as organic fertilizers. The distributions of the antibiotic resistome, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and bacterial community composition in soils during cultivation were evaluated by high-throughput qPCR and Illumina sequencing. The total ARGs and MGEs abundance in the biochar-treated soils were significantly lower than those in the compost-amended soils during cultivation. The total ARGs abundance in the biochar-amended soils was similar to that in the control soils during cultivation. Thus, the dissemination of ARGs from animal waste to the environment can be effectively mitigated by converting manure into biochar.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic resistome; Biochar; Composted manure; Microbial community composition; Soil

PMID:
30179818
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.368
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center