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Front Med. 2018 Dec;12(6):645-657. doi: 10.1007/s11684-018-0645-9. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

Mechanistic and therapeutic advances in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by targeting the gut microbiota.

Author information

1
Functional Metabolomic and Gut Microbiome Laboratory, Institute of Interdisciplinary Integrative Biomedical Research, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, 201203, China.
2
Functional Metabolomic and Gut Microbiome Laboratory, Institute of Interdisciplinary Integrative Biomedical Research, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, 201203, China. houkai1976@126.com.

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common metabolic diseases currently in the context of obesity worldwide, which contains a spectrum of chronic liver diseases, including hepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatic carcinoma. In addition to the classical "Two-hit" theory, NAFLD has been recognized as a typical gut microbiota-related disease because of the intricate role of gut microbiota in maintaining human health and disease formation. Moreover, gut microbiota is even regarded as a "metabolic organ" that play complementary roles to that of liver in many aspects. The mechanisms underlying gut microbiota-mediated development of NAFLD include modulation of host energy metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and bile acid and choline metabolism. As a result, gut microbiota have been emerging as a novel therapeutic target for NAFLD by manipulating it in various ways, including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation, and herbal components. In this review, we summarized the most recent advances in gut microbiota-mediated mechanisms, as well as gut microbiota-targeted therapies on NAFLD.

KEYWORDS:

NAFLD; bile acids; gut microbiota; insulin resistance; obesity; probiotic

PMID:
30178233
DOI:
10.1007/s11684-018-0645-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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