Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transplant Proc. 2018 Sep;50(7):2119-2123. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2018.02.138. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Endoscopic Islet Autotransplantation Into Gastric Submucosa-1000-Day Follow-up of Patients.

Author information

1
Foundation of Research and Science Development, Otwock, Poland. Electronic address: michal.wszola@medispace.pl.
2
Foundation of Research and Science Development, Otwock, Poland.
3
Department of General and Transplantation Surgery, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw, Poland.
4
Department of Immunology, Transplantology and Internal Diseases, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw, Poland.
5
Department of Internal Diseases and Cardiology, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw, Poland.
6
Foundation of Research and Science Development, Otwock, Poland; Department of General and Transplantation Surgery, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Total pancreatectomy and autologous transplantation of pancreatic islets is a treatment option for patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis. In the standard procedure, pancreatic islets are isolated and subsequently administered into the portal vein. In the case of patients with a history of thrombosis or at risk of thrombosis, this route of administration is not viable. Animal studies conducted in our department led to the development of a technique of endoscopic islets transplantation into the gastric submucosa. In 2013 and 2014, the first human autologous transplant procedures were performed. The objective of this study was to present the results of a 3-year follow-up of these patients.

METHODS:

Two pancreatectomies were performed in our department, the first in 2013 and another in 2014, along with subsequent autologous transplantation of pancreatic islets into the gastric submucosa.

RESULTS:

Both patients had been diagnosed previously with diabetes, and both had endogenous islet activity detected. Peptide C concentration after pancreatectomy and before pancreatic cell transplantation was 0.1 ng/mL. After the transplantation, peptide C concentrations for the 2 patients were 0.8 and 0.5 ng/mL on day 7, 1.2 and 0.6 ng/mL on day 30, 1.3 and 0.8 ng/mL on day 180, 1.1 and 0.7 ng/mL on day 360, and 3.0 and 0.6 ng/mL at 3 years, respectively, after transplantation. The pain symptoms resolved in both cases.

CONCLUSION:

Pancreatic islets may survive in the gastric wall. Endoscopic submucosal transplantation may present an alternative for the management of patients who cannot undergo a classic transplantation procedure.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center