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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 Jan;63(1):e1800384. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201800384. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Nutrimetabolomics: An Integrative Action for Metabolomic Analyses in Human Nutritional Studies.

Author information

1
Department of Food Quality and Nutrition, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.
2
Department of Safety and Quality of Fruit and Vegetables, Max Rubner-Institut, Karlsruhe, Germany.
3
Department of Agricultural and Food Science, University of Bologna, Italy.
4
Method Development and Analytics Research Division, Agroscope, Federal Office for Agriculture, Berne, Switzerland.
5
Biomarkers & Nutrimetabolomics Laboratory, Department of Nutrition, Food Sciences and Gastronomy, XaRTA, INSA, Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences, Campus Torribera, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. CIBER de Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain.
6
School of Agriculture and Food Science, Institute of Food and Health, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
7
Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Food and Nutrition Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
8
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Max Rubner-Institut, Karlsruhe, Germany.
9
Dipartimento di Scienza e Tecnologia del Farmaco Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy.
10
Nutritional Physiology, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany.
11
Plateforme d'Exploration du Métabolisme, MetaboHUB-Clermont, INRA, Human Nutrition Unit, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
12
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
13
Computational Biology Unit, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.
14
Molecular Nutrition Unit, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany.
15
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
16
Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.
17
Department of Molecular Physiology, Applied Metabolome Analysis, Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
18
INRA, UMR 1019, Human Nutrition Unit, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
19
Center Agriculture Food Environment, University of Trento, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.
20
Food Microbial Systems Research Division, Agroscope, Federal Office for Agriculture, Berne, Switzerland.
21
Else Kröner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
22
ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Core Facility Human Studies, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.
23
Departments of Biological Sciences and Computing Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Abstract

The life sciences are currently being transformed by an unprecedented wave of developments in molecular analysis, which include important advances in instrumental analysis as well as biocomputing. In light of the central role played by metabolism in nutrition, metabolomics is rapidly being established as a key analytical tool in human nutritional studies. Consequently, an increasing number of nutritionists integrate metabolomics into their study designs. Within this dynamic landscape, the potential of nutritional metabolomics (nutrimetabolomics) to be translated into a science, which can impact on health policies, still needs to be realized. A key element to reach this goal is the ability of the research community to join, to collectively make the best use of the potential offered by nutritional metabolomics. This article, therefore, provides a methodological description of nutritional metabolomics that reflects on the state-of-the-art techniques used in the laboratories of the Food Biomarker Alliance (funded by the European Joint Programming Initiative "A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life" (JPI HDHL)) as well as points of reflections to harmonize this field. It is not intended to be exhaustive but rather to present a pragmatic guidance on metabolomic methodologies, providing readers with useful "tips and tricks" along the analytical workflow.

KEYWORDS:

GC-MS; LC-MS; NMR; metabolomics; nutrition

PMID:
30176196
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201800384
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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