Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Jan;139(1):49-63. doi: 10.1111/ane.13023. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Eslicarbazepine acetate as monotherapy in clinical practice: Outcomes from Euro-Esli.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Epilepsy-Center Berlin-Brandenburg, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
2
Beaumont Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
3
FutureNeuro Research Centre, Dublin, Ireland.
4
Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
5
Hospital Universitario Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
6
Eisai Europe Ltd, Hatfield, UK.
7
Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effectiveness and safety/tolerability of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) monotherapy in clinical practice in Europe.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Euro-Esli was a pooled analysis of 14 European clinical practice studies. Responder rate (≥50% seizure frequency reduction) and seizure freedom rate (seizure freedom at least since prior visit) were assessed after 3, 6 and 12 months of ESL treatment and at last visit. Adverse events (AEs) and AEs leading to ESL discontinuation were assessed throughout follow-up. A subanalysis was conducted to assess outcomes for patients treated initially with ESL monotherapy and for patients treated at the last visit with ESL monotherapy.

RESULTS:

ESL was used as monotherapy in 88/2045 (4.3%) patients initially and in 229/1340 (17.1%) patients at the last visit. At 12 months, responder and seizure freedom rates were 94.1% and 88.2%, respectively, in patients treated initially with ESL monotherapy, and 93.2% and 77.4%, respectively, in patients treated at the last visit with ESL monotherapy. Corresponding values for patients treated initially with ESL adjunctive therapy were 74.8% and 39.0%, respectively; and for patients treated at the last visit with ESL adjunctive therapy, corresponding values were 70.4% and 25.9%, respectively. Safety and tolerability were generally comparable in patients treated with ESL as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy. The most commonly reported AEs (≥5% of patients in any group) were dizziness, somnolence, instability/ataxia, and fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS:

These clinical practice data support the use of ESL as monotherapy, as well as adjunctive therapy, for focal-onset seizures, complementing evidence from clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

Euro-Esli; adjunctive therapy; antiepileptic drug; clinical practice; eslicarbazepine acetate; focal epilepsy; monotherapy

PMID:
30176048
DOI:
10.1111/ane.13023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center