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Elife. 2018 Sep 3;7. pii: e36520. doi: 10.7554/eLife.36520.

In vivo detection of optically-evoked opioid peptide release.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Basic Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, United States.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, United States.
3
Center for Clinical Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine and St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, United States.
4
Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.
5
Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.
6
Washington University Pain Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, United States.
7
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.
8
Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, United States.
9
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Center for the Neurobiology of Addiction, Pain, and Emotion, University of Washington, Washington, United States.
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Contributed equally

Abstract

Though the last decade has seen accelerated advances in techniques and technologies to perturb neuronal circuitry in the brain, we are still poorly equipped to adequately dissect endogenous peptide release in vivo. To this end we developed a system that combines in vivo optogenetics with microdialysis and a highly sensitive mass spectrometry-based assay to measure opioid peptide release in freely moving rodents.

KEYWORDS:

mass spectrometry; microdialysis; mouse; neuroscience; nucleus accembens; opioids peptides; optogenetics

PMID:
30175957
PMCID:
PMC6135606
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.36520
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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