Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet Microbiol. 2018 Sep;223:51-58. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.07.015. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

First detection and frequent occurrence of Equine Hepacivirus in horses on the African continent.

Author information

1
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110, Pretoria, South Africa; Department for Companion Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210, Vienna, Austria.
2
Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Medical School Hannover (MHH) - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Feodor-Lynen-Strasse 7, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
3
Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Medical School Hannover (MHH) - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Feodor-Lynen-Strasse 7, 30625, Hannover, Germany; Department of Molecular and Medical Virology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44801, Bochum, Germany.
4
Equine Research Centre, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110, Pretoria, South Africa.
5
Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559, Hannover, Germany.
6
Department of Biometry, Epidemiology and Information Processing (IBEI), WHO-Collaborating Centre for Research and Training for Health at the Human-Animal-Environment Interface, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 2, 30559, Hannover, Germany.
7
Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Medical School Hannover (MHH) - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Feodor-Lynen-Strasse 7, 30625, Hannover, Germany; Department of Molecular and Medical Virology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44801, Bochum, Germany. Electronic address: eike.steinmann@ruhr-uni-bochum.de.
8
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110, Pretoria, South Africa; Department for Companion Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210, Vienna, Austria; Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: jessika.cavalleri@vetmeduni.ac.at.

Abstract

Since the discovery of equine hepacivirus (EqHV) in 2011, the virus has been detected in horse populations from more than twelve countries across five continents. EqHV seroprevalence has been reported to be as high as 61.8% and EqHV ribonucleic acid (RNA) prevalence to range between 0.9% and 34.1%. Molecular and serological indications of EqHV infection have never been reported in equids on the African continent. Therefore, investigation of EqHV prevalence in South African horses and subsequent viral genetic characterization contribute to a better understanding of the global epidemiology of this virus. In a cross-sectional study, serum samples from 454 Thoroughbred foals (aged 58-183 days) were analysed for anti-EqHV non-structural protein 3 (NS3)-specific antibodies (abs) with a luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) and for EqHV RNA by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Farms of origin (n = 26) were situated in South Africa's Western Cape Province. The associations between EqHV infection state and farm of origin, foal gender and foal age were subsequently described. Furthermore, nested PCRs were performed on parts of the 5'UTR, NS3 and NS5B genes of 17 samples. Samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were conducted. The population's seroprevalence was 83.70% and RNA was detected in 7.93% of samples. Increasing foal age was associated with decreasing ab prevalence and increasing prevalence of EqHV RNA. Sequences from South African EqHV strains did not show in-depth clustering with published sequences of EqHV isolates from particular continents. In conclusion, EqHV is present in the South African Thoroughbred population and appears more prevalent than reported in other horse populations worldwide.

KEYWORDS:

Equid; Hepacivirus A; Non-primate hepacivirus; Phylogenetic analysis; South Africa; Thoroughbred

PMID:
30173752
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.07.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center