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Am J Infect Control. 2019 Jan;47(1):65-68. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.06.015. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Changes in health care-associated infection prevention practices in Japan: Results from 2 national surveys.

Author information

1
Quality Improvement Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: fumienum@luke.ac.jp.
2
Quality Improvement Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Nursing, International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Department of Veterans Affairs/University of Michigan Patient Safety Enhancement Program, Ann Arbor, MI; Center for Clinical Management Research, Department of Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Department of Veterans Affairs/University of Michigan Patient Safety Enhancement Program, Ann Arbor, MI.
6
Department of Veterans Affairs/University of Michigan Patient Safety Enhancement Program, Ann Arbor, MI; Center for Clinical Management Research, Department of Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI.
7
Muribushi Project for Teaching Hospitals, Okinawa, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A national survey conducted in 2012 revealed that the rates of regular use of many evidence-based practices to prevent device-associated infections were low in Japanese hospitals. We conducted a second survey 4 years later to evaluate changes in infection prevention practices.

METHODS:

Between July 2016 and January 2017, the instrument used in a survey of Japanese hospitals in 2012 was sent to 1,456 Japanese hospitals. The survey assessed general hospital and infection prevention program characteristics and use of practices specific to preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Independent sample chi-square tests were used to compare prevention practice rates between the first and second surveys.

RESULTS:

A total of 685/971 (71%) and 940/1,456 (65%) hospitals responded to the first and second surveys, respectively. For CAUTI, only use of bladder ultrasound scanners (11.1%-18.1%; P < .001) increased. For CLABSI, use of chlorhexidine gluconate for insertion site antisepsis (18.5%-41.1%; P < .001), antimicrobial dressing with chlorhexidine (3.4%-7.1%; P = .001), and central line insertion bundle (22.9%-33.0%; P < .001) increased. For VAP, use of semirecumbent positioning of patients (65.0%-72.3%; P = .002), sedation vacation (31.5%-41.6%; P < .001), oscillating/kinetic beds (4.7%-8.6%; P = .002), and a collective VAP prevention bundle (24.8%-34.8%; P < .001) increased. Fewer than 50% of Japanese hospitals reported conducting CAUTI and VAP surveillance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Collaborative approaches and stronger incentives promoting infection prevention efforts may be warranted to further increase use of most evidence-based practices to reduce common health care-associated infections in Japan.

KEYWORDS:

CAUTI; CLABSI; Device-associated infection; Infection prevention; VAP

PMID:
30172609
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2018.06.015

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