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Int J Cardiol. 2018 Dec 1;272:341-345. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.08.062. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Magnitude and impact of multiple chronic conditions with advancing age in older adults hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America.
2
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Department of Quantitative Sciences, Baylor Scott and White Health, Dallas, TX, United States of America.
3
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America.
4
Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America.
5
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America.
6
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States of America. Electronic address: Robert.Goldberg@umassmed.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To examine age-specific differences in the frequency and impact of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions among patients aged 65 years and older hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

METHODS:

Study population consisted of 3863 adults hospitalized with AMI at 11 medical centers in central Massachusetts on a biennial basis between 2001 and 2011. The presence of 11 chronic conditions (five cardiac and six non-cardiac) was based on the review of hospital medical records.

RESULTS:

Participants' median age was 79 years, 49% were men, and had an average of three chronic conditions (average of cardiac conditions: 2.6 and average of non-cardiac conditions: 1.0). Approximately one in every two patients presented with two or more cardiac related conditions whereas one in every three patients presented with two or more non-cardiac related conditions. The most prevalent chronic conditions in our study population were hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Patients across all age groups with a greater number of previously diagnosed cardiac or non-cardiac conditions were at higher risk for developing important clinical complications or dying during hospitalization as compared to those with 0-1 condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of multimorbidity among older adults hospitalized with AMI is high and associated with worse outcomes that should be considered in the management of this vulnerable population.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple chronic conditions; Myocardial infarction

PMID:
30172472
PMCID:
PMC6173997
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.08.062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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