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Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2018 Dec;49:72-78. doi: 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.08.005. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

The experiences of new graduate nurses hired and retained in adult intensive care units.

Author information

1
Texas A&M University, College of Nursing and Health Sciences: 6300 Ocean Dr., Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. Electronic address: heather.degrande@tamucc.edu.
2
Texas Woman's University, College of Nursing: 304 Administration Dr. Denton, TX 76204, United States. Electronic address: fliu@twu.edu.
3
Texas A&M University, College of Nursing and Health Sciences: 6300 Ocean Dr., Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. Electronic address: pamela.greene@tamucc.edu.
4
Texas Woman's University, College of Nursing: 304 Administration Dr. Denton, TX 76204, United States. Electronic address: jstankus@twu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is a common practice that new graduate Registered Nurses are hired into adult intensive care units as initial entry into practise. There exists a practice readiness gap between nursing curricula and actual clinical practise expectations at adult intensive care settings; this has led to negative consequences and subsequent nurse turnover, a concern nationwide. Nonetheless, some new graduate nurses survived their initial transition and continue to practise in adult settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses who were hired into adult intensive care as a new graduate and survived their transition from novice to competent, starting the third year of practise.

METHODOLOGY:

The study used the hermeneutic phenomenology research approach.

FINDINGS:

Data analysis revealed the overall meaning of the experience: coming to terms with being comfortable with being uncomfortable. The six themes associated with being comfortable with being uncomfortable were: confidence and uncertainty, gaining experiences and forever learning, intuitive knowing and intuition, difficult and stressful, being courageous and assertive, and the team and support people.

CONCLUSION:

New graduate nurses can survive to become competent adult intensive care nurses. This study reveals the need to promote exposure to a variety of clinical situations early, to promote resilience and self-care, and to foster unit teamwork and mentoring to ensure successful transition and overall retention of new nurses hired into in adult intensive care.

KEYWORDS:

Competence; Critical care nursing; Hermeneutic phenomenology; Intensive care nursing; New graduate nurses

PMID:
30172466
DOI:
10.1016/j.iccn.2018.08.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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