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Lancet Child Adolesc Health. 2017 Oct;1(2):134-146. doi: 10.1016/S2352-4642(17)30021-4. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Arboviruses and pregnancy: maternal, fetal, and neonatal effects.

Author information

1
Institut Pasteur, Biology of Infection Unit, Paris, France; Inserm U1117, Paris, France; Paris-Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Centre d'Infectiologie Necker-Pasteur, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Institut Imagine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. Electronic address: caroline.charlier@pasteur.fr.
2
Paris-Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Centre d'Infectiologie Necker-Pasteur, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Institut Imagine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; Division of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Laval University and CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, Canada.
3
Institut Pasteur, Biology of Infection Unit, Paris, France; Inserm U1117, Paris, France.
4
Paris-Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Centre d'Infectiologie Necker-Pasteur, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Institut Imagine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.
5
Institut Pasteur, Biology of Infection Unit, Paris, France; Inserm U1117, Paris, France; Paris-Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Centre d'Infectiologie Necker-Pasteur, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, Institut Imagine, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. Electronic address: marc.lecuit@pasteur.fr.

Abstract

Arboviruses are an expanding public health threat, with pregnant women facing unique complications from arbovirus infections. These infections, such as dengue and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, can be more severe in pregnant women than in the general population. Vertical transmission is reported for many arboviruses and can severely affect pregnancy outcome. Indeed, arboviruses-particularly flaviviruses and alphaviruses-are associated with increased risks of fetal loss and premature birth. Arboviruses can be teratogenic, as is the case for Zika virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Finally, intrapartum transmission can result in severe neonatal infections, as is true for chikungunya virus. Although the global burden of arboviruses is well recognised, few studies have provided data on arbovirus infection specifically in the context of maternal and child health. Epidemiological and clinical studies are therefore needed to better assess the burden of arbovirus infections during pregnancy and to improve the prevention and clinical management of these viral infections. In this Review, we analyse the information available and identify gaps in knowledge that require further assessment.

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