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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Aug 30. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0297-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Consuming glucose-sweetened, not fructose-sweetened, beverages increases fasting insulin in healthy humans.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention Program, Division of Public Health Sciences and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Prevention Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
6
Cancer Prevention Program, Division of Public Health Sciences and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. mkratz@fredhutch.org.
7
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. mkratz@fredhutch.org.
8
Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. mkratz@fredhutch.org.

Abstract

Fructose-, compared to glucose-, sweetened beverages increase liver triglyceride content in the short-term, prior to weight gain. In secondary analyses of a randomized cross-over design study during which 24 healthy adults consumed 25% of their estimated energy requirement in the form of glucose-, fructose-, and high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverages in addition to an identical ad libitum diet for three periods of 8 days each, we investigated the hypothesis that fructose in sweetened beverages also triggers insulin resistance in the short term. Total energy intake, body weight, and fasting glucose did not differ among diet phases. However, there was a significant trend for higher fasting insulin (p = 0.042 for trend) and, among normal-weight participants, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (p = 0.034 for diet × adiposity interaction) according to the glucose content of the beverages. In conclusion, in contrast to our hypothesis, insulin resistance was increased with higher glucose vs. fructose content of the beverages in this short-term trial.

PMID:
30166639
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0297-5

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