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Aesthet Surg J. 2018 Aug 27. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjy221. [Epub ahead of print]

Lactation Outcomes in More Than 3500 Women Following Primary Augmentation: 5-Year Data From the Breast Implant Follow-Up Study.

Author information

1
Private Practice in Eugene, OR.
2
Private Practice in Las Vegas, NV.
3
Clinical Development at Allergan plc, Irvine, CA.

Abstract

Background:

Women with breast implants may have concerns about their ability to successfully breastfeed. The Breast Implant Follow-up Study (BIFS-001) is a large, 10-year observational study evaluating the performance and safety of Natrelle ® round silicone-gel filled breast implants.

Objectives:

This analysis compares lactation outcomes in women enrolled in BIFS-001 who gave birth after undergoing primary augmentation with Natrelle round silicone implants or saline implants.

Methods:

At baseline and annually after surgery (>5 year visit window), subjects completed questionnaires regarding pregnancy and lactation. Comparisons were made using summary statistics and odds ratios with 90% confidence intervals (OR [90% CI]).

Results:

A total of 4679 subjects gave birth at least once after primary augmentation for a total of 5736 live births during the study (silicone, 3695 births; saline, 2041 births). Of these, 3715 (79.4%) women breast-fed at least 1 child, resulting in 80.0% (silicone) and 75.9% (saline) of babies being breast-fed. The most common complication was insufficient milk production, which was reported for 19.6% (silicone) and 19.8% (saline) of single births (OR, 0.94 [0.83, 1.06]). Complications occurred at similar rates in each group when evaluated by incision type, implant size, pocket location, and age.

Conclusions:

In this large group of women who gave birth after primary breast augmentation with Natrelle round silicone implants or saline implants, most were able to breastfeed their infants without complications. Lactation complications were comparable between the silicone and saline cohorts, and the incidence was comparable to reports in the general population of women who breastfeed.

PMID:
30165661
DOI:
10.1093/asj/sjy221

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