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PLoS One. 2018 Aug 30;13(8):e0203403. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0203403. eCollection 2018.

Differences in the viral genome between HPV-positive cervical and oropharyngeal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas, United States of America.
2
Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas, United States of America.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine & Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas, United States of America.
4
Department of Adult Medical Affairs, Chan Soon-Shiong Institute of Molecular Medicine, Culver City, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven oropharyngeal cancer incidence in the United States has steadily increased in the past decades and has now become the most frequently diagnosed HPV-associated cancer type, surpassing cervical cancer. Variations in the HPV genome correlate with tumorigenic risk, and the distribution of genetic variants is extensively studied in cervical cancer, but very little is known about new mutations or the distribution of HPV types and variants in oropharyngeal cancer. Here we present an archival tissue cohort study that compares genomic characteristics of HPV associated with cervical versus oropharyngeal tumors using DNA sequence analysis. We found HPV16 to be more prevalent in oropharyngeal samples than in cervical samples (91.2% versus 52.9%), while HPV18 (1.5% versus 18.2%) and HPV45 (0.7% versus 9.9%) were much less prevalent. Differences between cervix and oropharynx in HPV16 variants distribution were more subtle, but the combined European + Asian (EUR+AS) variant group was more prevalent (90.2% versus 71.4%), while the American Asian 1 + American Asian 2 (AA1+AA2) variant group was much less prevalent (4.4% versus 22.5%) in oropharyngeal cancers. HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal cancers showed an increasing trend from 60% in 2003 to 80% in 2016. We also identified over nine times more nonsynonymous mutations in the HPV E6 gene amplified from oropharyngeal samples, but for E7 the difference in mutation rates between the two anatomical locations was not significant. Overall, we showed that HPV genome in oropharyngeal cancer presents important differences when compared to cervical cancer and this may explain the distinct pathomechanisms and susceptibility to treatment of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

PMID:
30161236
PMCID:
PMC6117069
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0203403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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