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Eat Weight Disord. 2018 Dec;23(6):841-848. doi: 10.1007/s40519-018-0562-6. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Helpful or harmful? The comparative value of self-weighing and calorie counting versus intuitive eating on the eating disorder symptomology of college students.

Author information

1
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, 1114 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA. kroma001@odu.edu.
2
The Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, 250 Mills Godwin Building, Norfolk, VA, 23529, USA. kroma001@odu.edu.
3
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, 1114 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA.
4
University Health Services, Florida State University, 960 Learning Way, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current study evaluated the comparative implications of self-weighing and calorie counting versus intuitive eating (IE) on the eating disorder (ED) severity of college students.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study, college students in the US [Nā€‰=ā€‰902; 68% female; mean body mass index (BMI)ā€‰=ā€‰24.3] completed the web-based Healthy Bodies Study in 2015.

RESULTS:

A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that elevated BMI, more frequent self-weighing and calorie counting, and lower IE scores predicted increased ED severity. The results of Kruskal-Wallis H tests indicated that participants with elevated weight statuses engaged in self-weighing and calorie counting more frequently, and possessed lower IE scores, than their lower weight counterparts.

CONCLUSION:

Engaging in self-weighing and calorie counting was adversely associated with ED severity among the present sample of college students. Cultivating IE within health promotion efforts may, instead, lead to favorable eating-related outcomes that may translate to the holistic health of this population.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

V cross-sectional descriptive study.

KEYWORDS:

Eating disorders; Intuitive eating; Obesity; Self-monitoring; Young adult

PMID:
30155857
DOI:
10.1007/s40519-018-0562-6

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