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Ann Neurol. 2018 Oct;84(4):611-615. doi: 10.1002/ana.25314. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Cerebrospinal fluid vasopressin and symptom severity in children with autism.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
2
Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
3
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
4
Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, Institute of Human Genetics, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
5
Section on Behavioral Pediatrics, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

Autism is a brain disorder characterized by social impairments. Progress in understanding autism has been hindered by difficulty in obtaining brain-relevant tissues (eg, cerebrospinal fluid [CSF]) by which to identify markers of disease and targets for treatment. Here, we overcome this barrier by providing evidence that mean CSF concentration of the "social" neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) is lower in children with autism versus controls. CSF AVP concentration also significantly differentiates individual cases from controls and is associated with greater social symptom severity in children with autism. These findings indicate that AVP may be a promising CSF marker of autism's social deficits. Ann Neurol 2018;84:611-615.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00298246.

PMID:
30152888
DOI:
10.1002/ana.25314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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