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Am J Med Genet A. 2018 Dec;176(12):2623-2629. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.40493. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

De novo variant in KIF26B is associated with pontocerebellar hypoplasia with infantile spinal muscular atrophy.

Author information

1
Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California.
5
Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
N Molecular Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California.
7
Center for Rare Childhood Disorders, Translational Genomic Research Institute, Phoenix, Arizona.
8
Division of Neurogenetics, Hugo W. Moser Research Institute, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland.
9
Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland.
10
Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.

Abstract

KIF26B is a member of the kinesin superfamily with evolutionarily conserved functions in controlling aspects of embryogenesis, including the development of the nervous system, though its function is incompletely understood. We describe an infant with progressive microcephaly, pontocerebellar hypoplasia, and arthrogryposis secondary to the involvement of anterior horn cells and ventral (motor) nerves. We performed whole exome sequencing on the trio and identified a de novo KIF26B missense variant, p.Gly546Ser, in the proband. This variant alters a highly conserved amino acid residue that is part of the phosphate-binding loop motif and motor-like domain and is deemed pathogenic by several in silico methods. Functional analysis of the variant protein in cultured cells revealed a reduction in the KIF26B protein's ability to promote cell adhesion, a defect that potentially contributes to its pathogenicity. Overall, KIF26B may play a critical role in the brain development and, when mutated, cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia with arthrogryposis.

KEYWORDS:

KIF26B; arthrogryposis; kinesin; microcephaly; pontocerebellar hypoplasia

PMID:
30151950
DOI:
10.1002/ajmg.a.40493

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